Cycling Washington DC

Cycling is a serious sport with many bike clubs and bike racing opportunities. There are many different types of road bikes to choose from and bike gear to get. Road bikes also require special maintenance and it’s good to know what bike shop to take your bicycles to for repairs. Please scroll down for more information and access to all the related products and services in Washington, DC listed below.

Bike the Sites
(202) 842-2453
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC
 
Thompson's Boat Center
(202) 333-9543
2900 Virginia Ave Nw
Washington, DC
 
Modell's Sporting Goods
(202) 399-6583
1518 Benning Road
Washington, DC
Hours
9:30AM - 8:30PM MONDAY - THURSDAY
9:00AM - 9:00PM FRIDAY - SATURDAY
11:00AM - 7:00PM SUNDAY

Revolution Cycles
(202) 965-3601
3411 M St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Bicycle Pro Shop
(202) 337-0311
3403 M St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Better Bikes
(202) 293-2080
PO Box 57179
Washington, DC
 
Metro Bicycle Lockers
(202) 962-1116
600 5th St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Alta Bicycle Share
(202) 554-2347
1812 Half St Sw
Washington, DC
 
A & A Discount Bicycles
(202) 337-0254
1034 33rd St Nw
Washington, DC
 
Bicycle Pro Shop
(202) 337-0311
3403 M Street NW
Washington, DC
 

Intense 951 FRO for Under $5000: Complete Bike

...
(6/10/2009)
Posted by Ryan Cleek
Intense has always offered racers the opportunity to purchase the same World Cup-capable DH frames their sponsored pros ride. The new 951 FRO continues that tradition. With the sport getting more expensive everyday, Intense wanted to put together a package that would enable aspiring racers to get on a high performance race bike that wouldn’t break the bank. By working with their suppliers they were able to come up with a great deal on a complete 951 FRO.



The package includes:
• 951 FRO frameset
• RockShox Vivid 5.1 shock
• RockShox Boxxer Team Fork
• SRAM X9 drivetrain
• Avid Elixir Brakes
• Truvativ bar, stem and post
• Azonic Outlaw Wheelset
• Chainguide, saddle, grips, tires, tubes, etc.
 Basically, everything you need to hit the track except pedals and a number plate!

38.5 lbs without pedals



MSRP $4951 complete as pictured∗
∗(actual kit will have black fork and stem, no pedals)

For availability visit Intense Cycles


Intense Cycles Inc. 
42380 Rio Nedo, Temecula, CA 92590
951-296-9596/ 951-296-9383 fax

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Test: Niner R.I.P. 9: Mid-Travel 29er that Competes with the All-Mountain Crowd

By: R, Cunningham
Niner's RIP 9 is in its second incarnation. Those familiar with the RIP 9 can tell you that it is designed to fulfil the aggressive trailbike role, including park riding. With 4.5 inches of suspension travel, one might mistake the RIP 9 for a cross-country oriented ride, but the big wheels act as a suspension multiplier, giving the Niner similar capabilities as a five or six-inch-travel all-mountain 26-inch-wheel design. 
 

In profile, the 2009 RIP 9 is enhanced by an elagantly flared top tube and a more streamlined, simplified frame configuration. Geometry is very close to the original. John Ker photo
 

To underscore this, Niner includes an ISCG boss on the bottom bracket to allow for a chain guide and single-ring crankset. The new chassis has new frame tubes, redesigned linkage arms and it is configured to work with the latest, 40-millimeter-offset 120-millimeter 29er suspension forks. We loved the RIP 9 when we rode the original, so we expected good things from the second-gen version--and that is exactly what happened. If you are a 29er fan, searching for a ticket to the wilder side of the mountain, this is it.
 
Niner's suspension is a dual-link type called CVA, an acronym for "Constantly Varying Arc." Niner has been in the vanguard of the 29er suspension movement and has solved many design isues inherent to the big-wheel bike. For starters, the lowe link swings below the bottom bracket, and the triagulated swingarm sits low in relation to the plane of the axles to obtain clearance for 2.35-inch tires and a short-for-29er chainstay length (17.9 inches). The seat tube is angled in its center to make room for the big tire at full suspension compression. The linkage configuration was chosen to keep the suspension moving under braking and acceleration and it does the job as promised. The feel is similar to Giant's excellent-performing Trance-series 26er trailbiikes--which is a high compliment.
 

Beefed up linkage arms and custom, pivot hardware bear witness to Niner's attention to detail. John Ker photo
 
 Up front, Niner uses a tapered steerer tube fork--no small feat, because Niner had to work with three fork makers to convince them to spring for the costs of producing a tapered-steerer 29er model with thru-axle options for a then-limited marketplace. RockShox, Fox and Manitou are on board, and just in case you want another option, adapters are available from the likes of Cane Creek that allow standard 1 1/8 inch steerers. Our test bike used a Fox RLC model. he advantage of the tapered head tube and steerer is a degree of stiffness in the steering as well as a wider, stronger tube to attach the top and downtube. 
 

Tapered...

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Local Events

Tour de Cure � Washington DC
Dates: 9/27/2014 – 9/27/2014
Location:
Washington D.C.
View Details

Bike MS: Ride the Riverside
Dates: 6/7/2014 – 6/8/2014
Location:
Fort Washington
View Details

Best Buddies Challenge � Washington, DC
Dates: 10/18/2014 – 10/18/2014
Location:
Poolesville
View Details

Tour de Cure � Maryland
Dates: 5/3/2014 – 5/3/2014
Location:
Cooksville
View Details
 

Volume 27, Number 6 June 2012

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 WARNING: Much of the action de­pict­­ed in this magazine is potentially dan­gerous. Virtually all of the riders seen in our photos are experienced ex­­perts or professionals. Do not at­tempt to duplicate any stunts that are be­­yond your own capabilities. Always wear the appropriate safety gear.